10 thoughts on “That is a REALLY good question

  1. As Maddox once pointed out – if you take their hokey “yo we down with the youth “I’m Lovin’ It”, take out the contractions so it reads “I am loving it” and then run in through an anagram site, you get:

    AILING VOMIT

    An afternoon Egg McMuffin sounds pretty fly though.

    Yo.

  2. If you consider what it would involve, yes, it IS too much to ask.

    Dunkin’ Donuts doesn’t serve hundreds of hamburgers an hour from the same grills that were making eggs at breakfast. Making one Egg McMuffin would involve about half an hour of cleaning and setting up again so as to cook eggs without their turning brown, and having them available all the time (without losing the ability to cook enough hamburgers at a time to keep up during busy periods) would mean a fairly hefty investment in extra equipment that there’s not room for anyway, for very nearly no extra sales at all.

    • I used to work as a short order cook, and I can assure you that eggs and burgers are cooked on the exact same griddle. There is no cleaning necessary. Have you ever heard of diners? A diner will cook you a burger and make your friend’s omelette all at the same time. Hell, they’ll even put a fried egg on your burger. And you don’t have to wait an hour for them to clean the griddle.

      • I used to work in the grill area of McDonald’s, and I can assure you that eggs and burgers are cooked on the exact same grill. EXCEPT, they’re cooked at different times and temperatures, and are cleaned from one item to the next. We ain’t talkin’ about diners, we’re talkin’ fast food.
        In a diner, it makes sense to cook eggs and a burger on the same griddle, especially if the egg is going on the burger. I’d do the same thing at home if I cooked anything, ever.
        But at McD’s, everything is precise, from the temperature of the grill, to the time the eggs cook, to the order in which you crack the eggs onto the grill, because there’s a gold standard, and every egg, McMuffin, cheeseburger, you name it, should look and taste the same at any McDonald’s. The salt/pepper ratio in the burger seasoning is regulated to the grain. The amount of mac sauce you get is determined by a calibrated condiment gun.
        During “changeover” or “transition” (the 30 minutes or so leading up to lunch), the grills are cleaned and set for lunch to higher temperatures. All-day breakfast at McDonald’s would mean extra equipment, extra labor, and extra food waste. In a high-volume store, with enough promotion, though,I bet it could happen.
        But I’m a dreamer.

        • Everything is precise by company-design, not be necessity. You could cook eggs on the same surface as burgers, at the same time.

          I understand your point about consistency, but restricting customer selection in the name of consistency is folly.

          Is it too much to ask that I be able to buy an egg mcmuffin at any time of day WITH THE UNDERSTANDING that it might not taste exactly the same as the ones served in the morning? It’s my damn taste buds and I don’t appreciate McDonald’s deciding for me that I prefer consistency to selection. Because I don’t.

          • Since this is a company-specific issue, it seemed like an important detail. Although technically, we could all make our own egg sandwiches at home any time…
            I just worked there too long. One of the first parts of manager training is understanding McDonald’s core values, and the first two of four are quality and service. Both would be compromised in this situation. The eggs would be cooked improperly or held in the heating cabinet too long and get gross. They may choose not keep muffins queued, and they take a minute or so to toast, so your order would take longer, negatively affecting both your perception of the service and the store’s service times, another regulation set at a company level. All day breakfast is a pipe dream.
            I believe in all day hash browns, though.

          • Certainly they could be. It would mean certain changes, though, including a lower temperature and therefore much longer cooking time for the burgers.

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